Hands-on Learning Institutes

Work with education leaders across several strands of tech integration and emerging technologies. Some of the strands: Digital Storytelling, Project-Based Learning, Play and Games-Based Learning, Data Visualization, Emerging Technologies, Measurement and Research, Maker, Open Education, Creativity and Visual Literacy.
 
Games-Based Learning - Institute of Play
This is a two day Institute for the Level 2 Workshop for those who have joined the Games-Based Learning Teacher Quest program.
 
Wearable Tech - Becca Rose

A hands-on workshop that explores the process of designing wearable devices within environmental contexts.

Wearable Tech will take participates on a journey through the design process of interactive devices. We will design in context and, through hands-on exercises, we will investigate diverse ways to teach and learn about wearable technologies. Expect to spend the morning making prototypes, geeking-out on smart materials, participating in open-ended discussion, and (dare I say it) having fun!

The workshop is suitable for all educators, no prior knowledge necessary, but it would be of special interest to teachers in design, computing, electronics, engineering, art, or performance.

 
Tech Integration - Scott McLeod

Lesson Makeovers: Secondary
We have a lot of technology floating around our schools and classrooms these days. And while that can and should be a good thing given the digital age in which we now live, we often find that our technology-related efforts aren’t paying off for us as we had hoped. For example, we see a lot of replicative use - doing the same things that we used to do in analog classrooms, only with more expensive tools - and we see many educators using technology simply for technology’s sake. There are many reasons why all of this is true, but a primary one is that we don’t have great ways to think about what is occurring when we see students and teachers using technology for learning and teaching purposes. This workshop is for secondary educators who wish to push their technology-infused pedagogy to new levels. We will blow right through TPACK and SAMR and use the trudacot question-and-discussion protocol to design and redesign middle and high school lessons across various subject areas. THIS is where the powerful conversations occur; THIS is the work we need to be doing as educators. We will use actual lesson plans and video exemplars to facilitate our work. Bring a willingness to rethink learning and teaching, a lack of defensiveness, and, preferably, a laptop or Chromebook (because iPads don't always play nice with Google Sheets).

Lesson Makeovers: Elementary
We have a lot of technology floating around our schools and classrooms these days. And while that can and should be a good thing given the digital age in which we now live, we often find that our technology-related efforts aren’t paying off for us as we had hoped. For example, we see a lot of replicative use - doing the same things that we used to do in analog classrooms, only with more expensive tools - and we see many educators using technology simply for technology’s sake. There are many reasons why all of this is true, but a primary one is that we don’t have great ways to think about what is occurring when we see students and teachers using technology for learning and teaching purposes. This workshop is for elementary educators who wish to push their technology-infused pedagogy to new levels. We will blow right through TPACK and SAMR and use the trudacot question-and-discussion protocol to design and redesign primary and upper elementary lessons across various subject areas. THIS is where the powerful conversations occur; THIS is the work we need to be doing as educators. We will use actual lesson plans and video exemplars to facilitate our work. Bring a willingness to rethink learning and teaching, a lack of defensiveness, and, preferably, a laptop or Chromebook (because iPads don't always play nice with Google Sheets).

 
Making: Children, Computers, and Powerful Ideas - Gary Stager
While this presentation will explore the virtues of learning-by-making and its theoretical and historical contexts, we will discuss the structural changes necessary to for schools to gain benefit from the maker movement. We must recognize that making is not new, but may still become a short-term fad without a coherent constructive educational vision having little to do with the construction of a “space.” The roles of expertise, continuous growth, prompt setting, project development, and curricular design to create the conditions necessary for sustaining and learning from making.
 
Emerging Technologies - Scott Klososky
 
Media Literacy - Ken Shelton
Designing Visual Thinking and Learning: Visual Storytelling and Cinematic Narrative
Our most effective communication method is through the use of visuals. We are often able to bridge language barriers and contextual barriers when we incorporate and utilize visuals in a meaningful manner. This workshop will guide you through two very distinct processes on communicated a story through visual means. We will first examine and experience the use of imagery to tell stories and represent our thinking. We will then look at a variety of strategies for incorporating multiple images in the same areas. Finally, we will go through the process of developing, designing, and producing artful storytelling through cinematic narrative.
 
Using Cinematic Narrative in the Classroom - Jim Sill
With all the fantastic visual stories being told in theaters, on TV, and online, it is tough to compete for a student's attention in the classroom. Filmmakers have reinvented storytelling for almost 120 years in order to keep up with viewer demand. Understanding the tricks of the entertainment industry allows us to create stories in our classrooms in passionate and engaging new ways.

As an award-winning video production teacher, Jim Sill will facilitate a detailed examination on how using film techniques in the classroom can help initiate wonder, generate higher degrees of engagement, and develop critical thinking skills. Learn how you can teach media literacy in your classroom to get students to stop blindly consuming what is being presented on the screen and start using it to tell their own story. When students and teachers understand the basics of media language they can understand what is being shown to them and communicate back with the technologies that today’s generation embraces.
 
Project-Based Learning - Suzie Boss
Take Thinking Deeper in PBL
Inquiry is the engine for learning in project-based learning. This session explores strategies to turn up the inquiry in PBL, whether you are a newcomer or veteran of the project approach. Among the topics we’ll explore: how to design projects that engage student interests while meeting academic goals; how to get projects off to a good start; how to manage the “messy middle” of PBL; how to connect students with experts outside the classroom; how to plan assessment strategies across the arc of the project. We’ll use PBL practices during a hands-on, collaborative learning experience.

Real-World Learning with PBL
Projects that connect students with the real world make the learning experience more relevant and memorable. This session introduces strategies and tools to expand projects beyond the classroom. We will explore strategies for designing community-based projects, in which students take the lead on local problem solving; opportunities for global collaboration and action; and re-thinking service learning through the PBL lens. Expect to make some real-world connections during this hands-on session.

NOTE: These sessions on project-based learning can be taken independently or as a two-part series.
 
Digital Storytelling - Bernajean Porter
Applied StoryTelling -- Curriculum Connections for Power Learning
Storytelling has never been JUST a literature skill – it can be acquired, mastered and applied as an enduring, art form useful across the curriculum. Applied storytelling [fiction and non-diction] achieves practical outcomes including making sense and meaning out of facts; increasing the depth and speed of learning; synthesizing complex concepts; clarifying our thinking; enhancing the “sticking power” of new concepts; influencing others; igniting action; inspiring understanding of ourselves and our world as well as crafting blueprints that build futures for individuals and cultures.

The story making process helps synthesize data bits into an essence of understanding that can be compelling as well as convincing. Participants will explore and create at least one of fourteen [14] applications of storytelling for learning including docu-dramas, public-service announcements, vision videos and infographics. Project ideas, processes and tools will be combined into participants' creating personal media expressions that taps into storytelling KLOUT!

Visual StoryTelling ~ Craftsmanship and Creativity with Still Images
From drawing on cave walls to cameras along with other emerging digital mediums, images continue to shape and influence our communication across time. Experience the art of visual storytelling, enthralling and captivating audiences through stand alone images as well as dynamic sequencing of images without words. Visuals are the ultimate “showing NOT telling” ensuring images chosen delivers illuminating experiences and deep understanding for meaning making. Visual communication taps into creativity, engagement, and deep introspection while delivering powerful “sticki learning” that builds individual influence skills with audiences.

Crafting any visual storytelling project will guide the learning curves for the grammar and fluency of communicating across the curriculum as students master their own art of expressing and representing understanding beyond words. Project ideas, processes and tools will be combined into participants' creating personal media expressions that deliver visual KLOUT!

 
Measurement and Research - Damian Bebell
Leveraging research and evaluation to inform your school's technology programs
As educators and school leaders, how do we know that our teaching, learning, and ICT investments and practices are having the impact we intend them to? How can we better inform decisions and improve our understanding of teacher, student, and parent sentiment in a quickly changing educational landscape?

In this session, educational researcher Damian Bebell will share real-world examples from schools that have leveraged simple research and evaluation techniques to inform and guide their ICT investments and programs. Sharing techniques and best practices culled from over a decade of ICT studies and collaborative research, this session will help educators design, use, and interpret results from teacher and student surveys, classroom observations, focus groups, and student drawings.
 
Visualising Student Data for Learning - Sujoy Chaudhuri
Provides an introduction to the Learning Analytics cycle and how Free and Open Source tools are being used in various contexts of this cycle to help further student learning. We will discuss tools, methods and protocols for looking at data, and discuss ways in which we can collect and analyse data that attempts to reach beyond achievement scores and attendance. 

Participants will

  • Use anonymised data from Standardised Assessments and Open-ended Student Surveys to:
    • explore the wide range of data types associated with student learning and methods by which to clean, manipulate and analyse the data
    • explore different ways in which the data can be visualised
    • use the Wonder-Observe-Connect-Question protocol to ask new questions from the data

Participants will also learn about

  • The learning analytics data cycle and how the cycle has been interpreted in one school's context
  • Our experiences with proprietary and open source tools
Geospatial Teaching & Learning - Ian Lockwood

Geospatial Teaching & Learning: Opportunities, Applications, and Ideas
This workshop is designed to help educators understand some of the developments and opportunities for geospatial learning in middle and high school programs. It begins with the idea of geospatial learning, progresses with with hands-on opportunities to try out some of the free web-based applications and concludes with a list of opportunities for incorporating GIS in an international school program.

In the last decade rapid advances have made remotely sensed (RS) images of the earth available to the public. Google Earth helped popularize and introduce Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to the wider public as a free web-based application. Devices with geo tagging and locational abilities have now become ubiquitous in our lives (GPS, smart phones etc.). GIS software once had a reputation for being both expensive and cumbersome to use, developments in commercial software (ESRI’s ArcGIS platform) and freeware such as Q-GIS now make it accessible to anyone interested. The cost of remotely sense imagery and other spatial data is within reach of organizations. Much of this is free and in the public domain. At the same time, growing concerns about changes on the planet associated with rapid economic development and a growing population has provided a real need for better analytical tools. GIS and remote sensing helps us to better understand and address these changes.

International Schools are beginning to use GIS in their secondary school curricula following on the heels of North American schools that have geography standards that incorporate GIS. Given the rapid change in software and hardware options it can be a daunting program to add on to a school’s already packed curriculum. GIS and RS offer ideal opportunities for inquiry-based, interdisciplinary learning in international schools settings. The workshop will highlight examples from the IB Middle Years and Diploma Programs.

Participants Will:

  • Review the idea of geospatial learning from a historical and educational point of view.
  • Learn about proprietary and open access GIS software options that are appropriate for internationals schools.
  • Access spatial data for use in school learning projects.
  • Create a compelling visual narrative with spatial references using ESRI’s Storymaps software.
Explore developments in South Asia and ways that the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) is sharing data through its Bhuvan platform.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Teachers interested in geospatial technology, geography/social science teachers, physics teachers, tech coordinators and any other curious people.

 
 
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